Archive for September, 2018

Gillard’s first interview: says she’ll pursue education and women’s issues in life after politics

Tuesday, September 11th, 2018

Julia Gillard has given her first known interview since losing the Labor leadership in June, in which she says she will be pursuing education and women’s issues on the global stage.
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Speaking to two representatives from the Laureate International Universities in New York including a student from Malaysia, Ms Gillard has said that she is looking forward to travelling and promoting causes overseas that she has been passionate about in Australia.

”I’m looking forward to doing some international travel and pursing internationally the causes I’ve been so passionate about locally in Australia, particularly education and empowerment for women and girls,” she said.

The interview came as Ms Gillard announced her memoirs will be published next year, and that she will be writing the book herself while events are still “emotionally and intellectually” fresh.

“I want to write a book so that in my own words, in my own way I can reflect on my period in politics,” Ms Gillard said on her deal with Penguin Random House.

“This will be my words direct.”

Ms Gillard announced the book deal in a promotion video with the publisher.

In her six-minute interivew with the university network, Ms Gillard said that it had been a mixed bag being Australia’s first female prime minister.

”It’s an experience that’s mixed, I’d have to say.  Endless focus on hair, and clothes and shoes and things that men don’t have to put up with,” she said.

The former prime minister said the only way to shift that focus was for more women to gain leadership positions.

”Once it’s more normal, then all of that chatter will become boring.”

The Clinton Global Initiative meeting is a prestigious annual gathering of global leaders including the likes of Bono, Barack Obama and IMF boss Christine Lagarde, to come up with ”innovative solutions to the world’s most pressing challenges”.

Ms Gillard is in New York attending the Clinton Global Initiative – a prestigious annual meeting of global leaders including the likes of Bono, Barack Obama and IMF boss Christine Lagarde, to come up with ‘‘innovative solutions to the world’s most pressing challenges’’.

The initiative is led by former US president Bill Clinton, together with his wife, former secretary of state Hillary Clinton, and daughter Chelsea. Mr Clinton also serves as Honorary Chancellor of Laureate International Universities.

Ms Gillard, who has kept a low profile since losing her job to Kevin Rudd, is attending the New York meeting for the first time. The six-minute interview with the university network did not include questioning about the former prime minister losing her job, the federal election or Mr Rudd.

When asked about key highlights of her time in power, she nominates pricing carbon and the National Disability Insurance Scheme along with her education reforms.

She said the ”trickiest” thing about leadership in a 24/7 media cycle was being ”focused on the long-term things that matter”.

A spokesman for Ms Gillard said she had no further comment about her New York trip. Her memoirs will be published in October next year.

Since losing the Labor leadership, Ms Gillard has not done any published interviews. She has written a lengthy essay about the Labor Party and its future, and is due to appear in a Q and A session with Anne Summers in Sydney and Melbourne next week.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Julia Gillard says she’ll pursue education and women’s issues in life after politics

Tuesday, September 11th, 2018

Memoir of a prime minister
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Julia Gillard has given her first known interview since losing the Labor leadership, in which she says she will be pursuing education and women’s issues on the global stage.

Speaking to two representatives from Laureate International Universities in New York, including a student from Malaysia, Ms Gillard has said that she is looking forward to travelling and promoting causes overseas that she has been passionate about in Australia.

”I’m looking forward to doing some international travel and pursing internationally the causes I’ve been so passionate about locally in Australia, particularly education and empowerment for women and girls,” she said.

The interview came as Ms Gillard announced her memoirs will be published next year, and that she will be writing the book herself while events are still “emotionally and intellectually” fresh.

“I want to write a book so that in my own words, in my own way I can reflect on my period in politics,” Ms Gillard said on her deal with Penguin Random House.

“This will be my words direct.”

Ms Gillard announced the book deal in a promotional video with the publisher.

In her six-minute interivew with the university network, Ms Gillard said that it had been a mixed bag being Australia’s first female prime minister.

”It’s an experience that’s mixed, I’d have to say.  Endless focus on hair, and clothes and shoes and things that men don’t have to put up with,” she said.

The former prime minister said the only way to shift that focus was for more women to gain leadership positions.

”Once it’s more normal, then all of that chatter will become boring.”

Ms Gillard is in New York attending the Clinton Global Initiative – a prestigious annual meeting of global leaders including the likes of Bono, Barack Obama and IMF boss Christine Lagarde, to come up with ‘‘innovative solutions to the world’s most pressing challenges’’.

The initiative is led by former US president Bill Clinton, together with his wife, former secretary of state Hillary Clinton, and daughter Chelsea. Mr Clinton also serves as Honorary Chancellor of Laureate International Universities.

Ms Gillard, who has kept a low profile since losing her job to Kevin Rudd in June, is attending the New York meeting for the first time. The interview did not include questioning about the Labor leadership, the federal election or Mr Rudd.

When asked about key highlights of her time in power, she nominated pricing carbon and the National Disability Insurance Scheme along with her education reforms.

She said the ”trickiest” thing about leadership in a 24/7 media cycle was being ”focused on the long-term things that matter”.

A spokesman for Ms Gillard said she had no further comment about her New York trip. Her memoirs are due to be published in October next year.

Ms Gillard said that she would be out to promote her book when it was published.

“It will be a big public contact for me in a way that I think I won’t have done since the days of being prime minister.”

Since losing the Labor leadership, she has written a lengthy essay about the Labor Party and its future, and is due to appear in a Q and A session with Anne Summers in Sydney and Melbourne next week.

Ms Gillard will take up an honorary professorship at the University of Adelaide in November.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Freo fans’ travel diary: day one

Tuesday, September 11th, 2018

Purple haze: Eagles-turned-Fremantle fans Andrew Dean and Frances Finch. Photo: Liam Ducey Not much leg room: Could you sit like this for 44 hours? Photo: Liam Ducey
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Liams-journey_420

Revelations that come to you, stone cold sober, at 1am, are never good. They’re usually along the lines of “oh God, I’ve made a terrible mistake …” I’m not claiming that quite yet. Time will tell.

But let’s backtrack for a second. At 7pm on Tuesday, I boarded one of two buses, full of mad Fremantle Docker’s fans, going across the Nullarbor. Non-stop. A 44+ hour, 3417 kilometre journey for the bargain price of $880 return. Each bus has two drivers, one sleeps while the other drives. They know I’m an Eagles fan and honestly they couldn’t care less. The more support the merrier.

I talk to the couple sitting across from me, Andrew Dean and Frances Finch, 26 and 27 respectively. Frances made the switch to the Dockers from the Eagles in ’95. Andrew, a New South Welshman, had no particular AFL inclination. His parents like rugby so he too liked rugby until he moved to WA. He joined the Dockers because he liked what he saw in the perennial underdogs.

He’s lucky he did. Frances met him at a party and they got along well enough to make plans for coffee. Realising she may have made a terrible mistake the next day, she sent him a text, asking if he was a Dockers fan. The rest, as they say, is history.

Frances, with her hair dyed, well obviously purple, makes a pretty good case for Fremantle as the neglectful boyfriend come good.

“You love this team so much and they just continue and continue to let you down, but every now and then they give you that little bit of magic and that little bit of spark that reminds you why you love them in the first place, then they just stuff it up again and leave you down in the dumps and depressed and crying,” she said.

“Right now, there’s some genuine heartfelt change going on.”

In the seat behind me there’s some heartfelt decision-making going on. Lucy Saracevic and her father Chris only decided on the bus on Tuesday morning. Lucy didn’t think she’d get tickets in the ballot, but the numbers fell her way and when you get the golden ticket, you have to take the ride. She doesn’t have anywhere to stay, and other fans are calling their hotels, frantically, trying to find her a room, any room. Eventually, she finds a place in Essendon with a spare room. It’s not close to the MCG and presumably she’ll have to swim through a wave of peptides, but a bed is a bed.

We make good time. The buses are quiet, most people have done a full day of work and they’re exhausted, as am I. A stop at the Tammin Roadhouse, where the Dockers guernseys are on proud display behind the counter, comes and goes, with steak and onion burgers and fried chicken snapped up by passengers.

After half an hour we’re off again and we’ve got Legends Of The Fall and Brad Pitt’s smouldering good looks to keep us company. It’s a natural anaesthetic, despite a brilliant performance from Bart the Bear, and the vast majority of the bus is asleep. Apart from, it seems, me. My 6’4” inch frame hasn’t been on a bus in a long time, and as I sit up from trying to get to sleep, it dawns on me. It’s not going to happen until I’m completely and utterly exhausted, and we’ve got 42 non-stop hours to go, at least.

Pav had better play his heart out for this.

Finally though, miracle of miracles, I drop off, somewhere between Norseman, where we stopped to refuel, and Balladonia, where we’re now getting breakfast. Only an hour or so, but it’s better than nothing. We’ve got a big stretch ahead of us, from Balladonia to Eucla to Ceduna. Watch out Hawthorn – we’re coming. Slowly.

Tweets by @the_unbrain]]>

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

America’s Cup a billionaire’s game: Bertrand

Tuesday, September 11th, 2018

The America’s Cup has come a long way from when Australia II won the Auld Mug in 1983, with the helmet and safety-equipment clad competitors now being akin to “test pilots”, winning skipper John Bertrand said on Wednesday.
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Bertrand told SEN that the technical advancements that made up the new AC-72 boats made the contest a “different game” from 1983 with campaigns now costing $100 million compared with the $1.5 million that was used for Australia II.

Where the Australia II caused controversy with its winged keel, the contests in the 12-metre category yachts now seem almost stately compared to the high-octane battles of the remarkable AC-72’s, which have been likened to formula one racing cars on the water as they reach remarkable speeds.

‘These boats are now sailing three times the speed of the wind, so in 10 knots of breeze they’re sailing 30 knots so it’s amazing what they’re achieving,” Bertrand said.

“They’re test pilots, these sailors now, because these things are airborne vehicles.

“They’re sailing on hydrofoils but the bottom line is it’s a young man’s sport, it’s a super athletic environment … the power on these boats that’s required is massive, the aerobic ability and also the smarts, so it’s a different game.”

Bertrand said he believed Australia would again compete in the America’s Cup, which he regarded as still “very, very prestigious around the world”.

“We’ve got a lot of guys the question is the cash,” Bertrand said.

“I think the multibillionaire coming out of Western Australian or Queensland who wants to become a global trader, that’s the sort of vehicle that could be of interest to him. The America’s Cup is still very, very prestigious around the world.”

As for the current series, Team America on Wednesday levelled at 8-8 after winning seven races in a row and leaving the series to be decided by a sudden-death race this week. Bertrand said it appeared that the American’s had benefited from intensive out-of-water testing during the series, which New Zealand had led 8-1.

“The bottom line is that the Americans have found another gear,” he said.

“They’ve done a lot of work with the technology at night with all the super computers and so on and they are sailing, I suspect, a shade faster in these conditions.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

New Lions coach Justin Leppitsch to call disgruntled players

Tuesday, September 11th, 2018

Justin Leppitsch with Brisbane Lions Chairman Angus Johnson. Photo: Angela Wylie Angus Johnson has more on his mind than a new coach. Photo: Angela Wylie
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Justin Leppitsch’s immediate priority as Brisbane’s new coach is to hit the phones to persuade the club’s band of disgruntled young players to stay at the club.

Leppitsch, 38 next week, was unveiled as the successor to Michael Voss – both were teammates during the Lions’ stunning triple-premiership stint just over a decade ago – in Melbourne on Wednesday morning. He said he was “very comfortable” in taking the position on a three-year contract, despite the turmoil engulfing the Lions’ board, centred on the tenure of chairman Angus Johnson.

“My job is to coach the team but I still understand within that you need a stable organisation and the club’s very aware of that – and that’s going to happen,” Leppitsch said. “Things will sort out, and we’ll strive to win this premiership.”

Johnson attended the unveiling but was steadfast in refusing to comment on the turmoil – which prompted the AFL to summon warring Lions directors to Melbourne for mediation – and whether he would be leading the club next season.

“The club made a statement yesterday – other than that [there is nothing more to say]. Today is about Justin Leppitsch,” Johnson said.

“We’re two years into a five-year strategic plan. That strategic plan has been embraced by all of our stakeholders, it’s been embraced by the AFL, our corporate sponsors. We’re achieving what we want to achieve – I’d say after two years we’re actually slightly ahead, and very confident with where the club is going, very very comfortable about where we are going to end up. Having Justin on board is going to ensure that we get there.”

Leppitsch has been recruited from Richmond, where he was the assistant coach in charge of defence. He was hailed by Johnson for his “outstanding references, experience, knowledge of the game and a desire to ensure he gets the absolute best out of everyone… players and staff”.

“It was an easy decision for the selection committee and the board… he’s just an outstanding individual. We couldn’t have hoped to get a better senior coach,” the chairman said of Leppitsch.

General manager of football operations Dean Warren, who chaired the coach selection committee, said Leppitsch’s status as a respected premiership defender for the Lions was not a key factor in his appointment but was instead “an added bonus”. He would not, however, detail how he thought Leppitsch would be superior to Voss, who was sacked late in the season.

“It’s an inappropriate question. Justin has been selected as our senior coach. Technically he’s very good, he’s an innovator of the game, understands what a competitive game plan looks like, has got very good presentation skills and can articulate his game plan,” Warren said.

Leppitsch confirmed his immediate priority was resolving the Lions’ “list issues”, and that he would contact out-of-contract players – Elliott Yeo, Patrick Karnezis, Jared Polec, Billy Longer, Sam Docherty, James Polkinghorne, Aaron Cornelius and also veteran Brent Staker – to sell his vision for the club.

“I’ll do that today, no doubt. It’s critically important we get started on that. I’d love to keep every one of the players, let’s be honest. They’re draft picks over the past few seasons and we need to get them on board. They’re a very important part of the future,” he said.

“I’ll do my very best to… present to them in a way that shows a very bright and clear future, and a pathway for them. I’m looking forward to starting and making those calls.”

While Leppitsch reiterated his goal to “keep the kids and ratify the issues they may have” he also said it was “more important for the club that we’re not in this position again, that we put parameters in place that our players want to stay and play for longer-term deals”.

Leppitsch did not give any clear indication on whether he wanted veterans Jonathan Brown and Simon Black, both former teammates of his, to play on in 2014. His only response was that it was crucial that any decision was made “in the right way”, and that if one or both were to depart if would have to be done “jointly and respectfully”.

The new coach also declined to say whether he would ask the Lions to pursue out-of-contract midfielder Dustin Martin, who he has worked with at Richmond.

“Obviously I know ‘Dusty’ well… I do have my views but I won’t share them here today,” he said.

“Every player is a package… you see that with what’s going on now at Collingwood with Heath Shaw.

“I won’t touch on Dustin’s particular issue, but… we have positives and negatives, or ticks and crosses. You have a lot of ticks and limited crosses [and you’re secure], or if they start evening up you may find your way out the door.”

Leppitsch said he would refrain from making “bold statements” regarding the timeframe for the Lions to be challenging for a premiership.

“I don’t think [first-year Port Adelaide coach] Ken Hinkley would have sat here last year and said ‘We’re going to play in the second week of finals’. Sometimes you get an immediate response, sometimes it takes a bit longer,” he said.

Leppitsch said he would demand competitiveness from his team, but also stressed the importance of creating a consistently enjoyable atmosphere for the players.

“If you don’t actually have fun along the journey you don’t perform, you’ll never actually enjoy turning up to training every day and giving your best. My goal really is to create an enjoyable working environment that… expects hard work,” he said.

Leppitsch also said he was not daunted by the requirement for him to not only coach the team but also promote the Lions in a region that also boasts rugby league, rugby union and soccer teams.

“I understand the Queensland marketplace. We don’t understand how good we’ve got it in Melbourne sometimes. In my time at Richmond you’ve not had to worry about building the game, but I understand that’s a very big component up there in Queensland,” he said.

Leppitsch said he was confident the board would give him sufficient money to properly equip the football depart. He said he has begun to his plan his panel of assistants, suggesting “a number of additions” could be made, but would not give any names as he admitted some were under contract.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.